Hype in Food, the Donburi style

Donburi is the food name for “rice bowl” in Japanese. That’s the base for this typical Japanese dish. Though, the variations, restaurants, and food chains that offer donburi style food goes as far as the cook can create. Most of the plates have the name of the main ingredient plus “don” in the end, the word for bowl, and even vary from region to region. My favorite from the list of basic Donburi, the Katsudon. Do you have any favorite? or any other recommendation to add? Let me know by leaving a comment in the section below.

Ticket Machine
Ticket machine at the entrance of a restaurant.

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Shinjuku Omoide yokocho yakitori alleys

Next to Shinjuku station, on the west area lies the narrowest area for yakitori bars. In the postwar era, many shopping districts were built, but few survived the pass of the years and contemporary times. Shinjuku was a transit area between residential districts, and places like Omoide Yokocho survived.

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Omoide Yokocho alleys, Shinjuku.

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Lost in Tokyo Station

Tokyo Station is one of the main transport hub located between the Marunouchi business district and the top brand luxury commercial Ginza district, and next to the Imperial Palace grounds. Hub for six of the Shinkansen lines, JR lines and Tokyo metro lines, makes Tokyo Station busiest station in Japan, regarding the number of trains. Not only its location and inside characteristics are worth mention, but the Tokyo Station building itself is a part of the history of Tokyo. Many times I used the rails and passed through Tokyo station to use the Shinkansen or my way to the airport, but it wasn’t until I tried to get out of the station and visiting its surroundings that I got completely lost on my first attempt.

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Entrance to Tokyo Station.

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Hype in Samurai Armor photo studio

Long gone are the days when samurai defended their lords and fought under the way of the samurai, known as “bushido”. The times of the armored samurai came to an end during the Meiji restoration, when the new government abolished the warrior caste, and forbid the use of katana. We’ve seen their armor and katana in museums. We’ve seen their stories in movies. Now there’s a chance to become a samurai, at least for a day, at the Samurai Armor Photo Studio, in Shibuya. I tried the experience and couldn’t have enough of the photoshooting and learning all my brain could retain about the samurai and the dressing process of the armor.

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Takemura volunteered for this amazing shot using real katana.

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